Spotted Owl - Suitable Habitat Model - Data - South Coast SBOT

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Published by the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development - Regional Operations - South Coast
Licensed under Access Only

SBOT = Stewardship Baseline Objectives Tool

See the Spotted Owl SBOT Web Viewer for detailed tables of the model criteria.

Throughout its range, the Spotted Owl is strongly associated with mature and old, late successional coniferous and mixed-coniferous forests. These forests are typically characterized by an uneven-aged cohort of trees; a multi-layered, relatively closed canopy; numerous large trees with broken tops, deformed limbs, and large cavities; and numerous large snags and accumulations of logs and downed woody debris. In moist parts of the range, these habitat characteristics are found naturally in late seral and old forests. In drier parts of their range (i.e., east of the Cascade Mountain Range), owls have been observed in younger forest stands where similar structural complexity was created by fire, wind events, selective logging, or disease factors such as root rot or mistletoe infections. For more information, please refer to the Recovery Strategy for the Northern Spotted Owl in Canada.

For the purposes of Spotted Owl habitat management, habitat has been divided into 4 habitat types based on the function and life requisites it provides.

Nesting Habitat
Nesting Habitat is the preferred habitat of Spotted Owls, and is chosen for use by the owl typically in greater proportion than its availability in the landscape. Nesting habitat provides for all of the owl’s life requisites that include the abilities for nesting, foraging and dispersal.

Foraging Habitat
Foraging habitat is used by Spotted Owls typically in the same proportion as its availability in the landscape. Foraging habitat provides for foraging and dispersal, but may lack structures to provide for nesting.

Dispersal Habitat
Dispersal habitat is used by Spotted Owls typically less proportion than its availability in the landscape. Dispersal habitat provide for dispersal (understory and cover), but may not support foraging opportunities and lacks structures for nesting.

Capable Habitat
Capable habitat is typically not used by Spotted Owls, but possesses the potential to grow into dispersal, foraging and nesting habitat in the future.

Data and Resources

Dataset Extent

Latitude: 48.0° to 60.0°
Longitude: -139.5° to -113.5°

Additional Information

More Information

Contact Information

NameSBOT Requests (pointOfContact)
Emailsbot@gov.bc.ca
OrganizationMinistry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Sub-OrganizationRegional Operations - South Coast
NameIan Blackburn (businessExpert)
EmailIan.Blackburn@gov.bc.ca
OrganizationMinistry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Sub-OrganizationRegional Operations - South Coast

Access & Security

Who can view this dataset? Public
Who can download this dataset?Not downloadable

Metadata Information

Record Published 2020-06-19
Record Last Modified 2020-06-19
Resource Status onGoing